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Storm tanks collected one million cubic metres of water during yesterday’s storm. - Storm tanks collected one million cubic metres of water during yesterday’s storm.

null Storm tanks collected one million cubic metres of water during yesterday’s storm.

Storm tanks collected one million cubic metres of water during yesterday’s storm.

2019-08-27

• The Butarque tank is completely full, and Arroyofresno’s at 95% of capacity. • These infrastructures prevent flooding and untreated water discharges when water flowing into treatment plants exceeds their maximum capacity.


  • The Butarque tank is completely full, and Arroyofresno’s at 95% of capacity.
  • These infrastructures prevent flooding and untreated water discharges when water flowing into treatment plants exceeds their maximum capacity.

The storm tanks in the Community of Madrid held more than 1 million cubic metres of rainwater after yesterday’s storm, an equivalent to the volume of the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium. Therefore, this infrastructure reached over 70% of its capacity in just a few hours.

Of this amount, two tanks alone, Butarque and Arroyofresno, which are the largest in the region, stored 780,000 cubic metres of rainwater: the first was completely full, and the second reached 95% capacity. All the water held in these installations is now being progressively pumped to different treatment plants in the region for treatment before going back into the rivers.

The main purpose of these facilities is to hold the water collected through the drainage system so that the wastewater volume reaching treatment plants keeps within the flow volume they can handle.

They also help prevent potential flooding and manage inflows of the first rains, which carry substances such as airborne metals, animal excrement, motor oils and other dirt that washes off roads, pavements, and collectors. Holding back all this rainwater makes it possible on the one hand to decant the water off all this dirt so it is easier to clean and on the other hand to pump the water to the treatment plants gradually, in a controlled way.

Overall, Canal de Isabel II has a network of 65 storm tanks in the Community of Madrid. Eight of them are located in the city of Madrid and can regulate more than 1.2 cubic hectometres of water, making Madrid the city with the largest network of storm tanks in the world. The remaining 61, which have a smaller capacity, are located in the rest of the region. Together they can store up to 1.48 cubic hectometres of water and regulate approximately 8 cubic hectometres of rainwater each year.

Canal de Isabel II was founded almost 170 years ago to supply water to the city of Madrid. It employs over 2800 people who work every day to serve more than 6 million people in the region. It is an innovative company, a leader in its sector and recognised worldwide for its management of the integrated water cycle.

 

It operates 13 reservoirs; 78 groundwater catchments; 17,601 km of water supply and distribution network; 131 drinking water and 133 wastewater pumping stations; 15,083 km of sewage networks; 65 storm tanks; 157 wastewater treatment plants; and 615 km of reclaimed water network.

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